How Hamburger Menus Can Increase Your Conversion Rate

by on 07/15/14 at 2:44 pm

Did you know that your website navigation can affect your conversion rate? Several studies have found that minimizing navigation on sign up pages increases conversion rates.

One explanation for this is that less navigation means fewer distractions when users sign up. Visible text links can tempt users to click away from the page. Minimizing your navigation focuses the user’s attention on completing the form.

Instead of minimizing, you could remove the navigation, but that would harm the user experience. Users may need the navigation to refer to other pages for more information. If they feel like you’re forcing them to sign up, they’ll feel uncomfortable and change their minds.

How Hamburger Menus Can Increase Your Conversion Rate

The way to maintain a high conversion rate and user experience is to replace your navigation with a hamburger menu. The icon doesn’t distract users from their task, and still gives them the freedom to go back to other pages. Text links draw a lot of attention, but when they’re inside the hamburger menu, users will only use them when they want to.

When users land on your sign up page they shouldn’t feel trapped or overwhelmed. A hamburger menu can give your sign up page a higher conversion rate without sacrificing user experience. The hamburger menu is more than a design trend. It’s a user interface technique to minimize navigation where you need it the most.


How Hamburger Menus Can Increase Your Conversion Rate How Hamburger Menus Can Increase Your Conversion Rate

Author and editor-in-chief of UX Movement. Loves great web experiences and fights for the user.

7 Responses to “How Hamburger Menus Can Increase Your Conversion Rate”

  1. Andrew Wirtanen

    Jul 15th, 2014

    “Minimizing your navigation focuses the user’s attention on completing the form.”

    True.

    “…you could remove the navigation, but that would harm the user experience. Users may need the navigation to refer to other pages for more information.”

    Maybe. After the user’s made a conscious decision to sign up, it doesn’t seem likely that they would need to refer to information on the rest of the site. I would argue that as long as the user knows how to get back to the navigation, then it is fine to remove it completely.

    “The way to maintain a high conversion rate and user experience is to replace your navigation with a hamburger menu.”

    It’s a possible design that does minimize noise on the page, but I wouldn’t say it is THE way. Also, many users don’t recognize the hamburger icon as a menu icon (see http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-icons).

    • Mathew Porter

      Jul 19th, 2014

      It would all depend on your user base and how exposed to the “hamburger icon” they are for its use as a menu button.

      I remember seeing the split test on exisweb and have seen a few more, but their hasn’t really been a definitive yes its better, most cases proved the opposite.

      I think like Andrew is saying, its not always black and white.

  2. Nikolaj Jensen

    Jul 16th, 2014

    It seems that it could be true in this context, but from what I can gather, you’re basically testing a dropdown menu vs links. And based on that I don’t think you can argue that the hamburger icon is better, it is the type of menu that is better. You should really test having the hamburger icon vs the label menu

  3. I would like to see research on how it actually increases conversions. I’ve been seeing more information and research on how the hamburger menu negatively affect conversions as this makes more sense esp since it’s not obvious what the icon is for: http://exisweb.net/mobile-menu-abtest

    A Tabbed menu across the bottom and trying to simplify your menu is the best option. If you do have a more complex menu, then just add a “More” tab that will display more links if necessary.

    • anthony

      Jul 17th, 2014

      That study refers to conversions as the # of users who CLICKED/TAPPED the button. This article is referring to conversions as the # of users who complete a SIGN UP FORM. These are two different types of conversion rates.

      If you’re saying that a hamburger menu gets less clicks than a visible navigation, then you are correct. But that’s NOT the premise of this article at all.

      • Makoto kern

        Jul 17th, 2014

        Yes, you are right. The point is that I would consider using a different technique to increase your sign up conversions and avoid using the hamburger menu, which is recently showing to be a potential conversion “decreaser” for other reasons.

  4. Janis Petke

    Jul 18th, 2014

    What on earth are you doing with a menu on a landing page anyway? Marketing 101, the only friggin link on such page needs to be your Call-to-Action and your 100% effort goes to making sure you convey everythign the visitor needs to know that he clicks it.

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