ArchivesTag : Buttons

Why Distinct Icon Outlines Help Users Scan Faster

Why Distinct Icon Outlines Help Users Scan Faster

Icons are visual cues that help users use interfaces more efficiently. Instead of reading each word on an interface, users can scan for the icon that represents the task they’re trying to do.

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Visual Weight of Primary and Secondary Action Buttons

Visual Weight of Primary and Secondary Action Buttons

When a user interface prompts users to take action, they’ll usually see two buttons. One button is primary to the user’s task and the other is secondary. To make this distinction clear, you have to use visual weight.

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Why ‘Ok’ Buttons in Dialog Boxes Work Best on the Right

Why ‘Ok’ Buttons in Dialog Boxes Work Best on the Right

A question designers often wonder when designing dialog boxes is where to place their ‘Ok’ and ‘Cancel’ buttons. The ‘Ok’ button is the primary button that completes the action the user initiated.

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Why Users Click Right Call to Actions More Than Left Ones

Why Users Click Right Call to Actions More Than Left Ones

How you design your call to action buttons can affect whether users click them or not. Most designers focus on how their call to action buttons look.

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Why ‘Sign Up’ and ‘Sign In’ Button Labels Confuse Users

Why ‘Sign Up’ and ‘Sign In’ Button Labels Confuse Users

How fast can you spot the difference between ‘sign up’ and ‘sign in’? Using these together as button labels causes users to click the wrong button because they’re too similar.

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Why the ‘Ok’ Button is No Longer Okay

Why the ‘Ok’ Button is No Longer Okay

On a user interface dialog box, clicking the ‘Ok’ button means that the user wants the system to act. Clicking the Cancel button means that the user wants to go back to the original screen.

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Best Practices for Call to Action Buttons

Best Practices for Call to Action Buttons

Your buttons may call users to act, but do they compel users to act? Buttons can come in different shapes and forms, but a button isn’t effective if it doesn’t compel users to take action.

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Use Low Color Contrast for User Interface Constraints

Use Low Color Contrast for User Interface Constraints

Low color contrast has always been a common problem in web design. The problem with low color contrast is that it makes text and buttons hard for users see. It’s usually best to use high color contrast on your website.

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Make Links Easier to Scan with Bullets

Make Links Easier to Scan with Bullets

A list of headlines stacked on top of each other can look like a big blob of paragraph text. I’ve noticed this when I try to scan the headlines on USA Today and LA times. It’s hard to tell which is a link.

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How to Use Gradients on Buttons

How to Use Gradients on Buttons

Gradients are often used on user interfaces to give it a natural look and feel. They act as a single light source lit from above mimicking the sun. This effect gives objects depth in appearance.

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